30+ Years of Freedom of Information Action

Mexico and Central America

Oct 7, 2015 | News
Washington, DC, October 7, 2015 - U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Earl Anthony Wayne said that “evidence of heavy-handed police tactics” was “strong and disconcerting” after a 2011 clash with student protestors from Ayotzinapa normal school left two youths and a gas station employee dead and several others wounded, according to a declassified cable from the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City.

May 12, 2015 | Briefing Book
Related Links Migration Declassified The Archive's blog on Mexico, migration, and human rights "Mexican Authorities Implicated in Violence, but U.S. Security Aid Continues to Flow" By Cora Currier and Jesse Franzblau The Intercept May 8, 2015 "Suspende EU apoyo a batallón del Ejército implicado en el caso Tlatlaya: “The Intercept”" By Marcel Turati Proceso May 10, 2015 "After Long Fight, Groups Pry Memo on Migrant Killings From Mexican Government" By Elisabeth Malkin New York Times December 23, 2014

Dec 22, 2014 | Briefing Book
Washington, DC, December 22, 2014 – With the Mexican government facing widespread public outrage over the alleged role of police and other officials in the September forced disappearance of 43 students, and the killings of at least six others, from Ayotzinapa Normal School, the country’s federal prosecutor (PGR) has for the first time declassified a document on the suspected participation of police in the kidnapping and massacre of hundreds of migrants in San Fernando massacres of 2010-11. The new revelations, along with key U.S.

Nov 16, 2014 | Briefing Book
Washington, DC, November 16, 2014 – Twenty five years have passed since the horrifying murders in El Salvador of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her daughter, during a rampage by Salvadoran security forces in the early morning hours of November 16, 1989, on the campus of the University of Central America (UCA) in the country's capital. It has been twenty five years of grieving by the victims' families and the Jesuit community; and twenty five years of waiting for justice to identify and prosecute the killers.

Sep 28, 2014 | Briefing Book
A 1980s-era document from the archives of El Salvador’s military intelligence identifies almost two thousand Salvadoran citizens who were considered “delinquent terrorists” by the Armed Forces, among them current President Salvador Sánchez Cerén, a former guerrilla leader. Other individuals listed include human rights advocates, labor leaders, and political figures, many known to have been victims of illegal detention, torture, extrajudicial execution, forced disappearance, and other human rights abuses.

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